It started with a tweet …

Errol Brown, singer with Hot Chocolate

"It started with a tweet ... who'd have thought it would end so sweet?"

Today is Valentine’s Day. For me, it’s been a very good one already. It started with a nice surprise: a lovely card and some delicious Hotel Chocolat treats from the missus that I found hidden in my T shirts drawer.

Then, part-way through the morning came another surprise. An email from a young Swedish woman that confirmed the start of our new relationship. A working relationship, I hasten to add. I’m emphatically a one woman man and always will be.

This email is the culmination of a journey that started with a tweet less than two weeks ago. I’d just started to follow a few new people on Twitter as part of my attempts to expand my client base. One of these people mentioned that she was looking to hire copywriters. It was late on Friday afternoon, and I was initially hesistant, but I decided to reply to the tweet to express my interest.

When I checked my email later that evening, I had a reply from her with more information. It sounded like a really interesting opportunity, and I responded to her request to send examples of my work, and a quotation for the kind of jobs they wanted me to take on. All of this happened on the Sunday, and then by the following Tuesday I’d had an email to suggest the company would be interested in working with me in the future. That was followed by LinkedIn connection requests from my initial contact and her CEO. I was impressed by the way they’d used social media to assess my credentials and get in touch.

Today’s email confirmed they’d love to work with me and laid out more formally the types of jobs they’d like me to do, and the terms etc. I’m delighted, because they seem like an exciting company to work with, and the way they want me to work will fit in perfectly around what I’m doing for other clients. Throughout the process my contact with them has been very warm and friendly as well as thoroughly professional.

So I have now expanded my client base into Europe for the first time, and I’m excited about the prospects ahead. It just shows how more proactive use of social media can yield results, for recruiters and freelancers alike.

I’m very grateful to Twitter for enabling me to make this contact and begin this new relationship. I’m hoping that, to adapt the Hot Chocolate song that inspired my headline:

“It started with a tweet …. who’d have thought it would end so sweet?”

Have any other freelancers and copywriters out there had any similar experiences of social media providing them with new client opportunities?

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Accuracy counts as mistakes cost £millions

Spelling mistake on billboard

A single mistake makes a world of difference.

Yesterday the BBC website featured a story that put a smile on the faces of all of us involved in business writing, as the headline screamed “Spelling mistakes ‘cost millions’ in online sales“.

It’s what many of us have been saying for years, and so it’s quite gratifying to have the importance of accuracy expressed in terms that business people can understand. If you’re sloppy with your copy, it’ll hit you where it hurts. In the bank balance.

Admittedly the article itself presents a slightly less convincing case in terms of empirical evidence than the headline suggests, but that’s not the point.

Accuracy counts

The point is, accuracy counts. And we have now got your attention.

As a business writer and plain English specialist who trains business people how to write more effectively, I am passionate about accuracy, in spelling, punctuation and correct usage. I’m not a pedant, but I value the correct use of the language I love, and I recognise how powerful it can be to communicate ideas quickly and easily when it is used properly.

What angers me is when people don’t think accuracy is important. When they shrug off spelling mistakes and take a weird kind of pride in the fact that they can’t use an apostrophe correctly.

“Because, at teh end of the day, as long as people understand what your saying, whats the problem?”

That’s something such people might write, and leave uncorrected, or not even realise there’s anything wrong with it.

But there is, and it’s hugely important!

Why?

Accurate = professional

The point is of course, that if you are dealing with a business, you expect them to behave in a professional manner, and adhere to certain standards. You would expect, and no doubt often do receive a high standard of customer service from many businesses on the telephone. Indeed many companies spend tens of thousands of pounds to train their staff to perform to exacting standards, and even record and monitor calls to check performance.

But for some reason, businesses pay far less attention to the accuracy of their written communication. Always have done. In the past, they could perhaps get away with it when they sent out letters to customers – who reads letters anyway?

But now, with the prevalence of e-commerce, so many businesses rely almost entirely on written communication through their websites and emails to attract, interact with and retain their customers.

And they are starting to come unstuck.

Good.

It’s about time!

The BBC article quoted William Dutton, director of the Oxford Internet Institute, who said:

“when a consumer might be wary of spam or phishing efforts, a misspelt word could be a killer issue.”

The fact is, customers are much more careful when transacting business online. They are wary of being caught by scams, identity theft, or security threats to their computers, so they tend to look for websites they can trust. Ones that look professional. If the home page of a site features spelling mistakes, consumers could be forgiven for thinking “Well, if they don’t care whether their own website is spelt correctly, how much are they going to care about looking after me?”.

And who can blame them?

We all make mistakes, but only some of us correct them

People make mistakes. We all do. It’s part of being human. No blame there. But there’s no excuse for not checking the accuracy of what’s been written and making corrections.

The entrepreneur in the article found that revenue on one of his sites doubled after a spelling mistake was corrected.

Sometimes it’s not because people can’t spell, or don’t care, but just lack of attention to detail.

Many years ago, a company I worked for came up with a new mission statement that they were keen to share with their customers and the general public. It was quite good, as mission statements go, but as soon as I saw it I realised that there was something seriously wrong with it. About halfway through it referred to offering “complimentary services”. What was meant of course was “complementary services” – services that would complement the company’s primary business offering. What they’d said though was “complimentary services”. As in free. Gratis. Not paid for.

Which was not what they meant at all. In fact, had the mission statement gone to press and been published on the website as it was intended to be, it would have at best been an embarrassing PR faux pas. At worst, the company could have ended up having to give away a lot of things for free.

I pointed out the error, and thankfully the crisis was averted. But it could have easily slipped through. And the reputation of the company would have suffered as a result.

You can’t guess in finance

Accuracy always counts in financial matters, so why not in writing? Can you imagine a senior management team presenting their annual report and accounts to their auditors with a note saying:

Some of the figures might be wrong, there’s a few decimal points in the wrong place and some of the calculations are a bit haphazard, but you get the general idea..”

Of course not! It would never wash. Which is why companies spend lots of money employing accountants and auditors – financial experts who are qualified to iron out any inaccuracies and ensure that everything is spot on.

Which brings me to my final point. As fellow writing professional Richard Hollins blogged yesterday, good copywriting is more than just spelling. We’ve established that spelling and correct punctuation is important, but let’s face it, those are just the basics. There’s far more to effective communication with customers than that. You need to engage them, enthuse them, excite them, entertain them even. And make sure you explain to them clearly why they need you and how you can help them.

Get professional help

It isn’t easy. Not everyone can do it. Which is why it’s a good idea to call in an expert to help you. Someone who spends all day, every day producing messages for a wide range of audiences that are pitched in just the right tone of voice, and use just the right words to attract, then keep their interest.

Someone who is a professional writer.

An accountant doesn’t  simply ensure that the figures are correct. They do much more than that. Clever financial things, with budgets and projections that help businesses plan for the future, manage their resources effectively, receive the maximum return on investments and make the best profits they can.

In the same way, a writer can do so much more than just ensure that your communications don’t contain mistakes. They can conjure magic with their words, transforming run-of-the-mill messaging into something compelling and persuasive. They can make your customers sit up and listen. Make them smile. Make them buy. Make them tell others how great you are. While you get on with doing what makes your business great in the first place.

Can you afford not to hire a copywriter or business writing professional?

It seems a lot of businesses think they can, and they’re not even getting the basics right.

Can you afford to lose customers?

Just the right name

Choose carefully!

What’s in a name? When it comes to company branding, the answer is ‘pretty much everything’.

With so many businesses vying for customers, across an ever-expanding range of media, trying to grab people’s attention has never been harder, or more critical to a company’s success. Of course, a catchy name is no guarantee that an enterprise will flourish, but in terms of attracting new custom within a fiercely competitive sector, a memorable moniker can give you a vital edge.

Standing out

Look at any business directory, whether it be a Google search or a good old-fashioned Yellow Pages and a brief look for any generic service or trade will yield hundreds, if not thousands of entries. Most of which will look frustratingly similar on screen or paper. How on earth do you choose between them? This is where a carefully chosen name can make a big difference. Something that stands out from the crowd and demands attention and further investigation. A little island of irony, an abstract archipelago boldly protruding from a sea of corporate blandness. Just something that demonstrates a dash of creativity and offers a hint of quirk.

For instance, imagine you are trawling through the swathes of local furniture removal companies in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the United States. And you happen upon a listing for Hernia Movers Inc. Now, you’re not likely to have been expecting that. You would probably take the time to click the link, or read the ad. And by the time you’d clocked the company strapline: “The Potentate of Totin’ Freight” you may well have dismissed the competition and be ready to give them a call! OK, maybe just me then. But it would certainly make you stop and look.

"Hernia Movers" furniture removals van

Not likely to forget a hernia in a hurry

Paws for thought before plunging down the pun hole

Use of humour, or the unexpected can be a path to success, providing you tread carefully. One man’s funny is another man’s tumbleweed. If your potential customers don’t get the joke, it’s your brand’s reputation that will be the laughing stock. Avoid puns at all costs. Even the good ones have a very fleeting shelf life. By the time you’ve finished smiling the impact has been lost and soon after that it becomes plain irritating. However, try telling that to the owners of Britain’s most pun-tastic business names. Thomson local directories ran a competition last year to find the ‘punniest’ company names which yielded a top ten that included the restaurants ‘Jamaican Me Hungry’ and ‘Wok This Way’ and a carpet firm called ‘Get Laid Professionally’…

Too clever by half

Another potential pitfall is the temptation to be a bit clever. There’s nothing wrong with an intelligent approach to business, or conveying that through your brand. In fact, it’s a sensible idea, providing you don’t get carried away and try to overreach. Nobody likes a smartarse, or goes out of their way to do business with them. If you need convincing of this fact, the Consignia debacle should be all the proof you need. Why on earth take two perfectly good, solid well-established brands, Royal Mail and the Post Office and try to replace them with a name that the vast majority of the Great British Public would struggle to spell or even pronounce properly, let alone understand or appreciate. I have similar misgivings about Aviva – what was wrong with plain old Norwich Union? Regardless of how much importance you place on the general populace appreciating the nuances of a brand’s identity, surely you’d have to agree that it’s in everyone’s best interests for them to at least understand what the word means, or is meant to signify.

Maybe in this digital media age, with its veritable smorgasbord of cool but odd-sounding online brands, the meaning is less important than the identity that is built around it. Judicious use of logo, corporate colours and a brilliantly designed and user-friendly website certainly play their part, and when those elements all combine with a unique offering and slick customer service, perhaps the actual word or words used for the company name are only a secondary consideration. Back in the days when Google was just a misspelling of Goggle and Twitter was strictly for the birds no-one would have sworn undying loyalty to those brands based on name alone – they had to match their identity with a game-changing product. And for every Lastminute.com and YouTube, there were plenty of Boo.coms that fell by the wayside when the reality of the consumer experience failed to live up to the hype.

Expert help?

There certainly is still plenty of evidence to suggest that people are taking company names very seriously though. Not least, the fact that there are a number of agencies that specialise in company naming. I have to admit I was quite surprised by this discovery, and even more so when a quick online search revealed that two of the most popular such companies revel in the names of A Hundred Monkeys and Igor, respectively. At the risk of appearing churlish, and not in any way wishing to denigrate these fine companies, I do wonder whether they chose their own appellations wisely. The former brings to mind the number of simian scribes to be matched to typewriters in the pursuit of Shakespearean perfection, and the latter conjures up a vision of a leering, hunchbacked simpleton serving at the behest of Dr Frankenstein. Both may have been deliberately chosen for those resonances of course – I don’t claim to have the mind of a marketeer!

Genius at work

Perhaps it’s better to enlist the services of someone who just has a knack for this kind of thing, who has an instinctive grasp of what works and what doesn’t. Someone like Tim Rich, who has written a great post on his blog ‘66,000 miles per hour’ about the art of naming. He’s the clever chap behind the name 26 for the professional writers’ organisation I recently became a member of. He also cites another moment of naming inspiration:

“A few months back I was briefed to name a lively new firm of consultants and accountants who specialise in advising arts institutions and creative agencies about money. The founding partner used to sing/shout in a punk band, and they wanted to sound more like their clients than their competitors. As I put the phone down the name Counterculture lit up in my mind.”

For me, that is an example of naming genius. In a single word, he has summed up the essence of the company, their background and their remit, and the very word chosen evokes an interesting, bold concept that suggests a business that will deliver, but in their own way, and stand out from the crowd.

Just the right fit

And that’s what I think lies at the heart of a great name. It captures your attention and holds it, and at the same time reveals something of the character of the company behind the brand. This was a major consideration when I was recently selecting a name for my fledgling freelance writing project. Certain practical factors played their part, not least the availability of a co.uk domain name to match, which cut out most of the more obvious word-related phrases. Eventually though I plumped for ‘Just the right words’ because it just felt right. It’s a name that gets right to the heart of what I do, and what I can offer, and it’s entirely in the spirit of someone who specialises in creative copy that engages readers through use of plain English. No frills, nothing fancy, just the right words. Obviously that simple message hides a huge amount of skill, energy and creative effort – hopefully the capability is implied. As is the message that I won’t provide you with any wrong ‘uns.

My mission is to free up clever business people to do all the stuff that makes their business work by writing the words that tell their existing customers and lots of potential new ones just how good they are at what they do. In just the right words.

I’m also more than happy to have a stab at choosing them just the right name!

Lost for words?

A man who is lost for words

Don't worry. We're here to help!

Are you feeling lost for words?

If so, you’re in exactly the right place.

Just the right words is here to help.

I can put the words right into your mouth, all over your website, and slap bang on every page of your sales brochures or corporate literature.

Whatever your message is, and whoever it’s for, I can make sure it gets across loud and clear, with the minimum of fuss and the maximum impact.

Whatever the media, whether an epic printed report, a dynamic e-newsletter or a pithy Tweet I can grab your audience’s attention and make them sit up and listen.

Whenever you need them, I am ready, willing and able to provide you with…. just the right words.

So, if you’re stuck, don’t ponder a moment longer – email garethcook@justtherightwords.co.uk and I’ll be only too happy to help you.